Apr 292015
 

In the next few months, we will be interviewing different people of the SATAA. For our first interview, we chose Karen Pratt, the new Chair of the SATAA. Read more about her here.

Karen

Judith:
Karen, you are the new Chair of the SATAA. Many in the community will know you already, but tell us some facts about yourself for those who don’t?

Karen:
I have been fortunate to explore several professional strands in my life. Areas of study and work have included medical microbiology, holistic healing work and since 2000 learning and development work.  I work as a TA trainer, personal coach, coach trainer and supervisor and Appreciative Inquiry facilitator and trainer. The common thread in all of this is enabling learning and transformation in people – whether being involved myself or training and supervising others in their work.

Judith:
When did you get to know about TA? And what is the biggest impact it has had on your life?

Karen:
I attended my first TA workshop, the TA 101, in 2001. It impacted me greatly and I continued on the journey and did my CTA exam in 2008 at the International TA Conference in JHB and qualified as the first Educational Transactional Analysis in Africa. I continued to become a Provisional Teaching and Supervising Transactional Analyst (PTSTA) as I wanted to both use TA and train others to use it. I successfully completed the Theory, Ethics and Teaching exam in San Francisco in August 2014 to become a Teaching Transactional Analyst. I am planning to do the final Supervision exam in Geneva in 2016.
I think it was the philosophy of TA that resonated so powerfully with me – everyone’s OK, everyone can think and everyone can change. I learned about this and more importantly experienced it from my TA trainers, especially Colin Brett who was my first TA trainer. He saw potential in me and believed in my ability to change and grow. My ongoing development and connection with the international TA community has shown me a way of being and doing that is wholesome, respectful and generative.

Judith:
What has been the biggest impact of your introducing TA to a person or an organisation that you have seen?

Karen:
Some of the most impactful and rewarding work has been my work with an NGO called Wellness Foundation. Our work is with community care workers providing self care workshops. TA is one of the pillars of this work. It has been wonderful to see people from many provinces in SA making sense of the TA models and start to feel affirmed and find their voice and their power. The organisation now has a strong advocacy group drawn from care workers who are lobbying government for carers’ rights. The TA models and diagrams seem to have the power to impact people across the country, whatever their language and level of education. It really gives people a framework within which to understand their lived human experience, and have options to change

Judith:
What are some of the things you do that ‘feed’ your natural child, that you love doing?

Karen:
I love music (I have a performers licentiate in organ) and now days I love singing – I am part of a local a capella group called Audivi. We sing very early unaccompanied music from composers such as Bach, Byrd, Monteverdi etc.
Other things that feed me are my practices of meditation and contemplative practices and regular aquarobics, Ai Chi, Pilates and yoga type exercises and Nia dance.
I love travel to new and different places, and being part of the international TA community has certainly allowed me to indulge this sense of exploration and adventure. I have met with my TA colleagues in diverse regions of the world: Istanbul, India, the UK, San Francisco, Montreal, Japan, Spain and shortly in Italy and Australia!

Judith:
What excites you the most about being the new Chair of the SATAA?

Karen:
I am excited about the potential growth of the ITAA with a new and younger executive committee with lots of energy and creativity. I believe that we will offer support and stimulation to the community of TA practitioners, and invite in new members. At this time in the history of South Africa, an understanding and use of TA can positively impact people of all ages and in all areas of our social fabric. One person doing a TA 101 is changed, and so potentially are their families, communities and places of work – a small stone in a pond that has the potential to ripple out.

Judith:
Thanks so much Karen.

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